Glossary of Terms

Chinese spellings are predominantly pinyin.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

tai-chi (taijiquan) in west wales

An: Push

Baihui: Acupuncture point at the crown of the head
Bubbling well: see yongquan
Bufa: The "eight energies" of Taijiquan

Cai: Pluck
Chan si gong: "Silk reeling" exercises
Chan si jing: "Silk reeling" energy
Chenjiagou: Village where Chen style taiji originated
Chi (qi 氣): "Life force energy", one of the Three Treasures of Taoist alchemy

Dajia: Large frame
Da lu: "Big roll back", practical two person sets
Dao, (Tao): see Tao
Dao: Knife, or broadsword

Erh lu: "Second path", the second routine in Chen style taijiquan. Also know as Paochui or "Cannon fist".

Fajing: The release of internal energy
Fangsong: Relaxing the mind
Form: A set of movements

Gang: Hard
Guan dao: "General Guan's Knife" a halbered
Gung bu: Forward stance

Hsin: The essential mind which produces the intent
Huiyin: Acupuncture point located between the anus and genitals
Huobujia: "Lively paced frame" taiji

Ji: Press
Jian: Sword
Jing (精): Vital essence, one of the Three Treasures of Taoist alchemy
Jing, (jin, ching or chin): Contraction of peng-jing; see peng-jing

Kao: Shoulder strike
Kua: The inguinal crease where the upper thigh joins to the hip on the front of the body

Laogong: Acupuncture point located in the middle of the palm
Laojia: "Old frame" taiji, used to denote the oldest known taiji forms of the Chen system
Li: Force
Lieh: Split
Lu: Roll back

Mingmen: Acupuncture point on the lower back

Neijia: The "internal" martial arts of China: taijiquan, xing-yi quan, bagua zhang, liuhobafa
Neijing: Internal strength. see peng-jing
Ni chan: Reverse spiraling or twining of the body

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Paochui: "Cannon fist". Another name for the erh lu or second routine in Chen style taijiquan
Peng: Ward off
Peng-jing, (peng-jin): Ward off energy or internal strength. The result of a relaxed structural alignment & mind-body conditioning. Frequently shortened to jing or jin, it may also be refered to as the moving jings or even qi. Called neijing in other internal martial arts
Pu bu: Crouching stance

Qiang: Spear
Qi (chi 氣): "Life force energy", one of the Three Treasures of Taoist alchemy
Qigong: Exercises to increase qi
Qinna: Joint locking techniques

Rou: Softness

San shou: Free fighting
Shen (神): Spirit, one of the Three Treasures of Taoist alchemy
Shuang dao: Double broadsword
Shun chan: Natural spiraling or twining of the body
Song: Relaxation

Taiji, (tai-chi): "Supreme ultimate" a Taoist philosophical concept connecting the primordial state (wu chi) to the two antithetical forces of yin and yang
Tan tien: Energy centre & physical centre of the body, located below the naval
Tao: "The way": central tenet of Taoism
Taolu: Solo form practice
Tu-na: Traditional breathing exercises

Wu de: Martial virtue or ethics
Wuji: Primordial state from which taiji arises
Wu wei: Taoist principle of passivity

Xia pan gong: Lower body strength training
Xiaojia: "Small frame" taijiquan
Xinjia: "New frame" taijiquan
Xu bu: Empty, or false stance

Yang: Positive, masculine, light, full
Yi (意): Intention; the physical nervous-muscular manifestation of what the mind thinks
Yi lu: "First road". The first routine in Chenstyle taijiquan
Yin: Negative, female, dark, empty
Yin - yang: Taoist concept of complementary opposites
Yongquan, (yung chuan): "Bubbling well" acupuncture point in the depression behind the ball of the foot

Zhan zhuang: "Standing post" training
Zhaobao: A village near Chenjiagou, origin of Zhaobao style taijiquan.
Zhong ding: Central equilibrium
Zhongjia: "Medium frame" taiji
Zhou pan: Twist stance

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