Glossary of Terms

Chinese spellings are predominantly pinyin.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

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An: Push

Baihui: Acupuncture point at the crown of the head
Bubbling well: see yongquan
Bufa: The 'eight energies' of Taijiquan

Cai: Pluck
Chan si gong: 'Silk reeling' exercises
Chan si jing: 'Silk reeling' energy
Chenjiagou: Village where Chen style taiji originated
Chi (qi 氣): 'Life force energy', one of the Three Treasures of Taoist alchemy, see main text

Dajia: Large frame
Da lu: 'Big roll back', practical two person sets
Dao, (Tao): see Tao
Dao: Knife, or broadsword

Erh lu: 'Second path', the second routine in Chen style taijiquan. Also know as Paochui or 'Cannon fist'.

Fajing: The release of internal energy
Fangsong: Relaxing the mind
Form: A set of movements

Gang: Hard
Guan dao: 'General Guan's Knife' a halbered
Gung bu: Forward stance

Hsin: The essential mind which produces the intent
Huiyin: Acupuncture point located between the anus and genitals
Huobujia: 'Lively paced frame' taiji

Ji: Press
Jian: Sword
Jin, (jing, ching or chin): The physical manifestation of "chi". Mind-body conditioning trained in all Chinese martial arts to supplement muscle strength; see peng-jin
Jing (精): Vital essence, one of the Three Treasures of Taoist alchemy

Kao: Shoulder strike
Kua: The inguinal crease where the upper thigh joins to the hip on the front of the body

Laogong: Acupuncture point located in the middle of the palm
Laojia: 'Old frame' taiji, used to denote the oldest known taiji forms of the Chen system
Li: Force
Lieh: Split
Lu: Roll back

Mingmen: Acupuncture point on the lower back behind the "tan-tien"

Neijia: The 'internal' martial arts of China: taijiquan, xing-yi quan, bagua zhang, liuhobafa
Neijing: Internal strength. see peng-jing
Ni chan: Reverse spiraling or twining of the body

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Paochui: 'Cannon fist'. Another name for the erh lu or second routine in Chen style taijiquan
Peng: Ward off
Peng-jin, (peng-jing): Ward off energy or internal strength. Called neijing in other internal martial arts. The refined 'body as one unit' jin of the internal arts were chi is used to develop the movement as well as generating strength, see main text
Pu bu: Crouching stance

Qiang: Spear
Qi (chi 氣): 'Life force energy', one of the Three Treasures of Taoist alchemy, see main text
Qigong: Exercises to increase qi
Qinna: Joint locking techniques

Rou: Softness

San shou: Free fighting
Shen (神): Spirit, one of the Three Treasures of Taoist alchemy. The subconscious mind that controls the involuntary muscle system
Shuang dao: Double broadsword
Shun chan: Natural spiraling or twining of the body
Song: Relaxation

Taiji, (tai-chi): 'Supreme-ultimate' a Taoist philosophical concept connecting the primordial state (wu chi) to the two antithetical forces of yin and yang
Tan tien: Energy centre & physical centre of the body, located below the naval
Tao: 'The way': central tenet of Taoism
Taolu: Solo form practice
Tu-na: Traditional breathing exercises

Wu de: Martial virtue or ethics
Wuji: Primordial state from which taiji arises
Wu wei: Taoist principle of passivity

Xia pan gong: Lower body strength training
Xiaojia: 'Small frame' taijiquan
Xinjia: 'New frame' taijiquan
Xu bu: Empty, or false stance

Yang: Positive, masculine, light, full
Yi (意): Intention; the physical nervous-muscular manifestation of what the mind thinks and visualisation to engage the subconscious minds activation of the involuntary muscle system
Yi lu: 'First road'. The first routine in Chenstyle taijiquan
Yin: Negative, female, dark, empty
Yin - yang: Taoist concept of complementary opposites
Yongquan, (yung chuan): 'Bubbling well' acupuncture point in the depression behind the ball of the foot

Zhan zhuang: 'Standing post' training
Zhaobao: A village near Chenjiagou, origin of Zhaobao style taijiquan.
Zhong ding: Central equilibrium
Zhongjia: 'Medium frame' taiji
Zhou pan: Twist stance

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